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B.C.N. Trading

MegaChef Kecap Manis

B.C.N. Trading

MegaChef Kecap Manis

Regular price $24.95

Description

After years of searching for the right one, we finally found a version of this Indonesian staple condiment we are proud to sell. Kecap manis, or “sweet dark soy sauce,” is an Indonesian secret for depth, umami and complexity. Megachef’s version—the best one we’ve tried—is virtually impossible to find in the United States. Of the handful of brands sold here, most are packed with thickeners, additives and flavorings; apart from a nominal amount of starch for consistency, Megachef adds no preservatives, artificial coloring or MSG, and its flavor is significantly bolder and richer than the other versions we’ve tried. Soy sauce from non-GMO soybeans and high-quality palm sugar are simmered until the sauce becomes thick and glossy, with a deep dark color and consistency similar to hoisin. The resulting sauce isn’t as salty as soy or as sweet as hoisin, the two most comparable condiments—but it has a funky malty, umami soy flavor, almost akin to molasses. Use it for Indonesian or Asian cooking or anywhere you might like a funky, barbecue sauce-like glaze.

Ingredients

Ingredients: Water, Raw Dark Soy Sauce, Cane Sugar Mixed with Coconut Sugar, Sugar, Syrup, Modified Starch, Potassium Sorbate
Allergens: Soybeans, Tree nuts (Coconut)

Specs

Net Weight: 16.7 fluid ounces
Place of Origin: Thailand

How to use

Try this sauce everywhere! Add 2 tablespoons of kecap manis to the sauce for any fried rice dish, like our Indonesian-Style Chicken Fried Rice. Use it in traditional dishes like Sweet Soy-Braised Pork (Babi Kecap) and Hainanese Chicken and Rice. Add to peanut sauce and serve alongside Singaporean Chicken Satay. Or simply brush fish, shrimp, steak or other meat with kecap manis before grilling.

MegaChef Kecap Manis

Regular price $24.95
$22.46Store Member
You use the word “kecap” more often than you think.

You use the word “kecap” more often than you think.

Kecap” comes from “koechiap” or “ke-tsiap,” the Cantonese word for “sauce” that described a popular pickled, spiced fish sauce. The sauce traveled to the Philippines and Indonesia—the birthplace of the word “kecap”—where it was picked up by British traders. Throughout the 18th century, British versions of “katchup” proliferated, typically including bold flavors like spice, beer, anchovies, vinegar and fruit. The mild, sweet, tomato-based version of ketchup we use today came from American attempts in the 19th century to better preserve the sauce.

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